The Not-so-secret Way to Secure Grants: Strong Nonprofit-grant Writer Partnerships

superhero girlMost nonprofits want to secure contributed revenue through grants. That’s often why they pursued nonprofit status in the first place. Some think the path to grant funding is hire a grant writer, sit back, and wait for the grants to roll in. While nonprofits should breathe a sigh of relief when they find a good grant writing partner, their involvement in pursuing grants does not end there. Nonprofits and grant experts like PGC actively partner to secure grants together in six steps.

  1. Share knowledge and define priorities
    When a nonprofit hires a grant consultant, they must gather all information needed to share their story, history, and future direction. A good grant writer will get to know the nonprofit’s vision for growth, learn about their greatest priorities, and then develop a strong case for support.
  2. Identify potential “good-fit” funders
    Consultants conduct prospect research to identify grant prospects that are a strong match for the nonprofit’s mission, program goals, and geographic region. That starts from within. Who does the board and staff know at foundations and corporations? Who are past donors? Then they identify new opportunities and develop a comprehensive prospect list.
  3. Qualify and cultivate
    Next, PGC works with nonprofits to qualify and cultivate donor prospects. Will the prospect invest in the mission? If so, what is the best fit for the opportunity? Clarity often comes through cultivation. What is the funders’ interest? Is this a match? What’s the best pitch?
  4. Define program goals, outcomes, and budgets
    The pursuit of grants can only occur after a nonprofit develops a strong case for support. When the nonprofit provides plans and program descriptions, and articulates clear goals, outcomes, and timeline, the consultant will be able to move to step 5.
  5. Develop a strong proposal
    PGC will use the nonprofits’ materials and interview key staff to develop compelling proposal narrative. The consultant will fit the nonprofit’s existing program budget into the funder’s required format, and create or gather supporting documents.
  6. Edit, finalize and submit
    Because the nonprofit knows their work best, they will closely review and ensure the proposal is telling their story. Once approved, the consultant finalizes and sends to PGC’s expert editors for a fine-tooth combing. Lastly, the consultant submits the application on time with a persuasive cover letter.

The takeaway? This is a process that PGC has down to a science. The end-result is not only millions of grant dollars for nonprofits, but also clarity of mission, evidence of outcomes, and real tools to make a case for support to anyone.

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